Keeping The Cost Down: Bulova Watch Repair

Published: November 26, 2013
Bulova 2901 Movement on left, Miyota 2035 Movement on the right.

Bulova 2901 Movement on left, Miyota 2035 Movement on the right.

We try to service our customers well by keeping the cost of watch repairs as low as is possible. Recently, an extended family member sent me a Bulova Watch that was having setting problems – the stem and crown had come out of the watch when he had attempted to set it during the daylight savings transition. This watch’s case number, for reference, was C8341111 with a Bulova 2901 movement.

After talking to the customer, we determined that it would be the best course of action to replace the movement with the movement it was based on. Bulova appears to have contracted this particular movement to Miyota; the 2901 is laid out nearly identically to a Miyota 2035. We “upgraded” and used a Miyota 2035 Super because the 2035 Super specifies  4 years of battery life.

Another thing I like about the Miyota 2035 Super is that it has a protective cover over the coil. This is great for the customer, as a lot of quartz watches die at the hands of poorly trained or careless battery exchange clerks – go in with a good watch, they nick the coil, and the watch is now dead.

This Bulova C8341111 is ready for many more years of service.

This Bulova C8341111 is ready for many more years of service.

This was a rather uneventful repair – the movements fit identically. Hands went on smoothly, and the old stem, which was in perfect shape, was used without issue.

Bottom line: By going with a Miyota movement, the cost of parts was more than halved, and the customer will never have a problem getting their watch serviced in the future.